Light Shrimp Carbonara

posted in: Beachbody, Health, Recipes | 0

Light Shrimp Carbonara

Shrimp Carb
We all seem to love Carbonara.  Try this light Shrimp Carbonara recipe and let me know what you think.
8 oz whole wheat spaghetti
12 oz of pre – cooked frozen shrimp, thawed
1 slice of bacon, cut into 1/8th inch pieces
1 clove of garlic, crushed
1/3 c ready to eat bacon bits ( Hormel or Oscar Mayer)
1/2 c grated Parmesan
2 eggs
salt and pepper
Cook pasta as directed and set aside.  Heat frying pan and put in bacon and garlic.  Saute for 2 or 3 minutes until the grease starts to cook out of the bacon a bit.  Add the cooked spaghetti.  Toss occasionally until noodles are hot.  Add bacon bits, grated Parmesan and shrimp.  Toss until evenly distributed, a couple minutes.  Take off the heat and add the eggs and toss until everything is coated.  Let sit for a couple minutes to let the egg set, then season with salt and pepper.
Simple, fast and way healthier than my old recipe (which I still love too).  This one is a keeper!
Your Partner In health,
Debi
https://www.facebook.com/fitatanyagewithdeb/

Holiday Eating -Now What?

posted in: Beachbody, Health, Myths, Recipes, Shakeology | 0

Holiday Eating – Now What?

 

I will be writing some articles on how to keep your weight in control over the Holidays. Holiday eating is a killer.  Halloween through New Years can be a killer for your new found health. In a study, the researchers found that half of annual weight gain in the U.S. occurs during the holiday period. You have worked hard all year don’t let it go to waste in the last few months of the year.  Recipes, health tips, easy exercise will be included.

Santa thin

 

Avoiding holiday weight gain may sound as feasible as Santa fitting down billions of chimneys on Christmas Eve, but we promise there are logical strategies to stay on track. Many of us experience weight gain during the festive winter months, but packing on a few pounds in December is far from inevitable . Don’t get us wrong—the holiday season is all about celebrating, having fun, and indulging. So pass the eggnog and yule log (in moderation) and let’s tackle how to navigate holiday party food spreads, hectic schedules, and sidelined gym routines—without turning into Mr. Scrooge.

How to prevent holiday weight gain

Now that we’ve established how important it is to avoid weight gain during the holidays, let’s look at some strategies for keeping it off. Remember, there’s no one-size-fits-all approach to diet and nutrition. The recommendations I’m making here are not for normal weight, healthy individuals. They are for people that are already overweight and/or have a tendency to gain weight easily. In those cases, we might suspect that the homeostatic system that regulates weight is impaired in some way, and a specialized approach is required.

Some of these recommendations may surprise you if you believe that calories don’t matter and weight gain is not possible as long as you’re eating a nutrient-dense, low-carbohydrate diet. I used to think this was true myself, but after further research and more experience working with people, I now know that it is not. If you’re confused about this, please don’t get frustrated. We have all been there.

A food is rewarding when it makes us want to eat more of it. Palatable and reward usually travel together, but there are exceptions. For example, most people think steak tastes good, but it doesn’t tend to encourage eating beyond satiety.

Choosing foods that are lower on the reward value scale during the holidays is one way of spontaneously reducing your calorie intake. But what makes a food rewarding? There are several factors, including:

  • sugar, fat and salt content
  • calorie density
  • certain textures (fat that melts in mouth, crunchy, soft/easy to chew)
  • free glutamate
  • starch
  • certain aromas
  • variety of flavors, textures, foods
  • many other flavors can become rewarding when associated with above nutrients
Looking at that list, it’s not hard to see why holiday meals would promote overeating!
With that in mind, here are some tips for eating more simply during the holidays:
  1. Don’t add additional fat to your food. Skip the gravy and don’t put butter on your mashed potatoes (if you’re making them yourself, use less butter or cream in the first place). I personally add milk that is 1 or 2% and cream cheese that is 1/3 the calories.  It is still yummy but less calories over all.
  2. Reduce the variety of flavors, textures and foods you eat. Choose a main dish and one or two sides and stick with that.

Eat less

This one is easier said than done, right? The best way to accomplish this for most people is to focus on reducing the energy density of the food they consume. Energy density is defined as the number of calories in a given weight of food. A Paleo diet contains foods that are typically low on the energy density scale: animal protein, fruits, vegetables and tubers. A holiday feast contains foods that are typically high on the energy density scale: stuffing, bread, pie, cream, butter, gravy, etc.
Here are a few tips for reducing energy density:
  1. Add extra vegetables and starchy tubers (without added fat).
  2. Add extra protein to your meal.
  3. Chew your food thoroughly. This increases satiety.
  4. Cook a Paleo holiday meal and minimize energy dense foods typically associated with the holidays.

Move more

Exercise may not be a great strategy for weight loss, but it’s likely that physical inactivity helps prevent an increase in the body fat set point, and studies have consistently shown that exercise prevents weight gain and maintains leptin sensitivity in animals.
In the U.S., at least, holidays tend to be associated with a lot of TV watching, especially among sports fans. That means additional time sitting on your butt, which isn’t a particularly good way to burn calories.

So make sure to get plenty of exercise during the holidays. Take long walks after meals, add some extra workouts, stand whenever possible instead of sitting, and reduce your TV time.

 

I hope this will give you are start. Watch for more articles, tips recipes etc on this website or my Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/fitatanyagewithdeb/

 

Please feel free to add in the comments and other tips you have come across that help you.

Your Partner in health,

 

Debi

 

Damage to Teeth

posted in: Health, Myths | 0

Foods That Damage to Teeth

 

Just how bad are these foods for your teeth? Damage repairs are in most cases are very costly. Try to stop damage to your teeth early.

 

What you eat matters:

While these hard candies seem harmless, eat too many and the constant exposure to sugar can be harmful to your teeth. Hard candies also put your teeth at risk because in addition to being full of sugar, they can also trigger a dental emergency such as a broken or chipped tooth. Better alternative? Chew sugarless gum that carries the ADA Seal.

suckers

Ice is for chilling, not chewing

You’d be surprised at how many people think ice is good for their teeth. It’s made of water, after all, and doesn’t contain any sugar or other additives. But chewing on hard substances can leave your teeth vulnerable to a dental emergency and damage enamel. Advice: Break the habit and enjoy water in its liquid form.

ice-cubes

Watch your citrus intake

The truth is that frequent exposures to acidic foods can erode enamel, making teeth more susceptible to decay over time. So even though a a squeeze of lemon or lime can turn a simple glass of water into a fun beverage, it’s not always the best choice for your mouth. Citric fruits and juices can also irritate mouth sores. Make sure to drink plenty of plain water.

  • Excessive soft drink consumption (high levels of phosphoric and citric acids)
  • Fruit drinks (some acids in fruit drinks are more erosive than battery acid)
  • Dry mouth or low salivary flow (xerostomia)
  • Diet (high in sugar and starches)
  • Acid reflux disease (GERD)

citrusfruit.ashx

Not all coffee is good for you

In their natural form, coffee and tea can be healthy beverage choices. Unfortunately too many people can’t resist adding sugar. Caffeinated coffee and tea can also dry out your mouth. Frequent drinks of coffee and tea may also stain your teeth. If you do consume, make sure to drink plenty of water and try to keep the add-ons to a minimum.

coffee

Sticky foods are your mouth’s worst nightmare

When it comes to picking healthy snacks, many people put dried fruit at the top of the list. But many dried fruits are sticky. Sticky foods can damage your teeth since they tend to stay on the teeth longer than other types of food. If you find yourself eating dried fruits or trail mix often, make sure to rinse with water after and to brush and floss carefully.

Sticky foods

Beware of things that go “crunch”

Who doesn’t love the nice, satisfying crunch of a potato chip, pretzels, etc.. ? Unfortunately potato chips/pretzels are filled with starch, which tends to get trapped in your teeth. If you choose to indulge in snacks like these, take extra care when you floss that day to remove all the food particles that can lead to plaque build-up.

Pretizel

We All know about this one.. Right? Swap out soda with water

When you eat sugary foods or sip sugary drinks for long periods of time, plaque bacteria use that sugar to produce acids that attack your enamel, the hard surface of your tooth. Most carbonated soft drinks, including diet soda, are acidic and therefore, bad for your teeth. Caffeinated beverages, such as colas can also dry out your mouth. If you do consume soft drinks, try to drink alongside a cup of water.

do_you_drink_acid

Limit alcohol consumption

Alcohol causes dehydration and dry mouth. People who drink excessively may find their saliva flow is reduced over time, which can lead to tooth decay and other oral infections such as gum disease. Heavy alcohol use also increases your risk for mouth cancer.

Drinks

 

So many more but here is the last one for today. Did you know?

Watch out for sports drinks

They sound healthy, but sugar is a top ingredient for many sports and energy drinks. Sports drinks may boost your energy, but they can also weaken your teeth. The American Academy of Pediatrics says sports drinks can be helpful for young athletes engaged in prolonged, vigorous physical activities, but unnecessary in most cases. Before your next sip, check the label to make sure your drink of choice is low in sugar or drink water.

sports-energy-drinks-

Important think to remember if you must have these things drink water right after and then when you can brush your teeth to remove the rest to help protect damage to your teeth.

Watch for more articles on health tips. Subscribe to learn when new articles are posted. 

Your Partner in Your health,

Debi

3 Day Refresh – Tips

3 Day Refresh. Ready to rock. No excuses.

 

The summer has ended and I have been on an off all summer. Made excuses all the time not to keep up with my healthy living. You know BBQ’s, dinner with friends, dinner out and getting up later. Not good. So I have started a 3 Day Refresh and here is how I am doing.

 

3 day refreash 2

Day before you start do yourself a favor and prep for the next 3 days. It helps.

3 day refresh 2

 

Day one is complete! Here are my thoughts:

  • The fiber drink is the best I have had. I was nervous about this as I have tried them before and literally gagged as I drank them.
  • I was not hungry all day. You are actually eating often and need an hour in between meals so I felt like I was eating all day!
  • Getting two fats (natural Peanut Butter and hummus) make me happy.
  • The vanilla fresh was good. Tomorrow I will add cinnamon and vanilla to jazz it up.
  • I have had a headache all afternoon. I am attributing this to a lack of caffeine as I typically have multiple cups of coffee a day. Hoping to feel better in the morning!

So there is day one! I’m surviving, and only two days to go. I can do this!  3 Days people that is all it takes.

Look for Day 2 and 3 coming up on my 3 Day Refresh.

Your Partner in Health,

Debi

Join me @ https://www.facebook.com/fitatanyagewithdeb

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