Holiday Eating -Now What?

posted in: Beachbody, Health, Myths, Recipes, Shakeology | 0

Holiday Eating – Now What?

 

I will be writing some articles on how to keep your weight in control over the Holidays. Holiday eating is a killer.  Halloween through New Years can be a killer for your new found health. In a study, the researchers found that half of annual weight gain in the U.S. occurs during the holiday period. You have worked hard all year don’t let it go to waste in the last few months of the year.  Recipes, health tips, easy exercise will be included.

Santa thin

 

Avoiding holiday weight gain may sound as feasible as Santa fitting down billions of chimneys on Christmas Eve, but we promise there are logical strategies to stay on track. Many of us experience weight gain during the festive winter months, but packing on a few pounds in December is far from inevitable . Don’t get us wrong—the holiday season is all about celebrating, having fun, and indulging. So pass the eggnog and yule log (in moderation) and let’s tackle how to navigate holiday party food spreads, hectic schedules, and sidelined gym routines—without turning into Mr. Scrooge.

How to prevent holiday weight gain

Now that we’ve established how important it is to avoid weight gain during the holidays, let’s look at some strategies for keeping it off. Remember, there’s no one-size-fits-all approach to diet and nutrition. The recommendations I’m making here are not for normal weight, healthy individuals. They are for people that are already overweight and/or have a tendency to gain weight easily. In those cases, we might suspect that the homeostatic system that regulates weight is impaired in some way, and a specialized approach is required.

Some of these recommendations may surprise you if you believe that calories don’t matter and weight gain is not possible as long as you’re eating a nutrient-dense, low-carbohydrate diet. I used to think this was true myself, but after further research and more experience working with people, I now know that it is not. If you’re confused about this, please don’t get frustrated. We have all been there.

A food is rewarding when it makes us want to eat more of it. Palatable and reward usually travel together, but there are exceptions. For example, most people think steak tastes good, but it doesn’t tend to encourage eating beyond satiety.

Choosing foods that are lower on the reward value scale during the holidays is one way of spontaneously reducing your calorie intake. But what makes a food rewarding? There are several factors, including:

  • sugar, fat and salt content
  • calorie density
  • certain textures (fat that melts in mouth, crunchy, soft/easy to chew)
  • free glutamate
  • starch
  • certain aromas
  • variety of flavors, textures, foods
  • many other flavors can become rewarding when associated with above nutrients
Looking at that list, it’s not hard to see why holiday meals would promote overeating!
With that in mind, here are some tips for eating more simply during the holidays:
  1. Don’t add additional fat to your food. Skip the gravy and don’t put butter on your mashed potatoes (if you’re making them yourself, use less butter or cream in the first place). I personally add milk that is 1 or 2% and cream cheese that is 1/3 the calories.  It is still yummy but less calories over all.
  2. Reduce the variety of flavors, textures and foods you eat. Choose a main dish and one or two sides and stick with that.

Eat less

This one is easier said than done, right? The best way to accomplish this for most people is to focus on reducing the energy density of the food they consume. Energy density is defined as the number of calories in a given weight of food. A Paleo diet contains foods that are typically low on the energy density scale: animal protein, fruits, vegetables and tubers. A holiday feast contains foods that are typically high on the energy density scale: stuffing, bread, pie, cream, butter, gravy, etc.
Here are a few tips for reducing energy density:
  1. Add extra vegetables and starchy tubers (without added fat).
  2. Add extra protein to your meal.
  3. Chew your food thoroughly. This increases satiety.
  4. Cook a Paleo holiday meal and minimize energy dense foods typically associated with the holidays.

Move more

Exercise may not be a great strategy for weight loss, but it’s likely that physical inactivity helps prevent an increase in the body fat set point, and studies have consistently shown that exercise prevents weight gain and maintains leptin sensitivity in animals.
In the U.S., at least, holidays tend to be associated with a lot of TV watching, especially among sports fans. That means additional time sitting on your butt, which isn’t a particularly good way to burn calories.

So make sure to get plenty of exercise during the holidays. Take long walks after meals, add some extra workouts, stand whenever possible instead of sitting, and reduce your TV time.

 

I hope this will give you are start. Watch for more articles, tips recipes etc on this website or my Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/fitatanyagewithdeb/

 

Please feel free to add in the comments and other tips you have come across that help you.

Your Partner in health,

 

Debi

 

Who Sabotages your Diet Plans – Part 2

posted in: Beachbody, Health, Myths, Shakeology | 0

Who Sabotages your Diet Plans

sabotage-small

 

Please take time to read Part 1.  Important for your over all health.

There’s saboteur in every crowd— at the office, in your church group, among your closest friends and family. Sometimes they mean well, sometimes they seem a tad malicious, often they have no idea how they’re sabotaging you. But every time you take a step forward to gain dominion over food, they’re at your elbow– offering you a brownie, some chips, an extra heaping helping of pasta.

 

Experts sum it up in one word—Change. Getting fit through diet and exercise creates big changes in your life—changes you should welcome. But if your friends and family aren’t in the same mode of change, they can be oblivious, jealous, and uncomfortable with your changes. Perhaps:

  1. They feel guilty. You’re losing weight and getting in shape. They’re not. Tempting you to “fall off the fitness wagon” means you’re “normal” again, and they can feel good about the status quo.
  2. They don’t understand. They’ve never had a weight problem and just don’t realize how hard you’ve worked to get where you are. They think it’s “silly” for you to worry about what you eat.
  3. They miss the old you. That is, the cookies you brought to work, the after-work “happy hours” spent in the company of high-fat potato skins, the luscious desserts you used to indulge in. Maybe you’re spending more time in the gym and have less free time for them. Maybe they’re afraid to lose you.

Don’t overreact, but don’t give up either! Try these strategies to vanquish your perennial food foes:

 

Don’t assume the worst. Unless sabotage is blatantly deliberate, give saboteurs the benefit of the doubt when it comes to their motives. If your mother serves you lasagna—your favorite– perhaps it’s because she equates food with love, not that she wants you fat. At any rate, it doesn’t pay to get defensive.

Just say no. You wouldn’t expect to have a drink forced on you if you were a recovering alcoholic, and you shouldn’t have to submit to having fattening food foisted on you. Tell the food pusher, “No, thanks,” and leave it at that. You don’t owe an explanation. Nor do you need to feel guilty if you choose to avoid someone who’s not helpful to your cause.

Take it and leave it. Granted, the thought of wasted food is hard for many of us. You don’t have to be a member of the clean plate club. Remember, there are times when discretion is the better part of valor.

Look for patterns. Be on the lookout for situations that trigger your diet downfalls, perhaps with a food journal. It may help you recognize people and events that do you in, allowing you to develop strategies to deal with them. If you know, for example, that there are likely to be donuts by the office coffeemaker, it’ll be much easier to resist them if you have your own healthy but satisfying snack.

Set up your own support system. If you can recruit friends and family to your cause, you may be able to create a valuable support system. Numerous studies show that when your social network supports you, you reap positive results. If that’s not feasible, take a different approach: join a weight-loss group, (Team Beachbody)  or avoid friends (at least temporarily) who are a negative influence, maybe even make new friends who share your goals. You’ll get stronger with time, and be able to handle the not-so-supportive folks.

Ask for help. Keep in mind that your weight-loss needs are unique. Don’t expect loved ones to exercise telepathy to know what your needs are. Tell them! Be fair and reasonable, especially with those who share your home. They may be willing to make compromises, at least for shorter periods of time, about what foods are kept and cooked in the house.

Be a grownup. Remember that what you put in your mouth is your responsibility. While others may tempt you, ultimately you’re in charge of your own life. Look at difficult situations as opportunities to flex your newfound control muscles– and reinforce the idea that you’re not adopting a healthier lifestyle for someone else, but for you.

 

We all can make excuses for not keeping to our goal.

Here are a list of some of mine.  Do they sound like yours?

  1. Oops,  I ate that candy bar.. now the day is a waste.

2.  I am so busy to worry about what I am eating

3.  Cost to much to buy healthy food – Remember if you are cutting out the junk you can afford the healthy *

4.  Here is a big one – The Holidays..

5.  I not feeling well today

6. To stressed out

7. Exercise – I hate exercise

 

I have friends tell me all the time that they can’t afford it or they are just to busy to stay on a plan or  I will start again when I have more time or it is not so close to the holidays. REALLY people you can say this?

WHAT is your health worth to you?

Please feel free to share your ideas or excuses in the comment box. Would love to hear from you.  Want to use some of your thoughts in my next article.

 

21 day to habit..

Watch for Part 3

 

Your Partner in Health,

 

Debi

Contact me @ https://www.facebook.com/fitatanyagewithdeb

 

 

Shakeology and Diabetes

posted in: Beachbody, Health, Shakeology | 0

Shakeology and Diabetes

diabetes

Shakeology is certified low glycemic.

Why its 24 GI rating matters to you?
The results are in. Shakeologyis now certified low glycemic. It’s another stamp of approval that Shakeology is good for you. But that’s not all. Shakeology came in at just 24 on the glycemic index (GI). A number that’s very low and something to be excited about. Simply put, the glycemic index is a way to measure how carbohydrates react in your blood. When you eat carbs, your blood sugar level rises anywhere from a little to a lot. The GI uses a scale of 0 to 100, with higher numbers given to foods that cause the most rapid rise in blood sugar. Shakeology and diabetes work well together.

What’s the glycemic index?

High-GI foods cause the body to produce higher levels of insulin but sometimes too much. This gives you an energy burst, known as a “sugar rush.” It feels good at first, but then your blood sugar drops rapidly to lower than normal levels, known as a “crash.” Eating low-GI foods is a smart way to avoid the “sugar rush and sugar crash” cycle. And they’re good for you because they stabilize blood sugar and insulin levels.
High blood sugar drives your body to produce more insulin.
Blood sugar
Foods with a high-GI (above 70)
include white bread, pretzels, French fries, and most processed foods. Eating these foods
triggers a rapid rise in blood sugar and insulin levels, which:
Encourages your body to store fat
Creates a cycle of hunger pangs and feeling unsatisfied
Causes an energy crash that leaves you irritated and tired
Can lead to high blood pressure, fluid retention, and diabetes
Foods with a low-GI (under 55)
include spinach, oatmeal, peanuts, and Shakeology. Consuming these foods helps stabilize blood
sugar and insulin levels, which:
Increases levels of glycogen, a hormone that causes body fat to be burned
Gives you a feeling of satisfied hunger
Helps balance moods
Reduces the risk of heart disease, helps control diabetes, and positively affects the aging process
Gycimic
Here’s why:
Believe it or not, Shakeology’s GI rating of 24 is much lower than most fruits, some vegetables, and pretty much every processed food ever made.
It keeps your sugar levels in check while supplying nutrition that satisfies, energizes, and helps promote good health.
Hope this helps you understand Diabetes and Shakeology.
I always say check with your doctor.  We have many people doing well drinking Shakeology everyday.
Comments are always welcome.
Your Partner in Health,
Debi
Check me out @  https://www.facebook.com/fitatanyagewithdeb

Who Sabotages Your Diet Plans Part 1

posted in: Beachbody, Exercise Programs, Health, Myths | 0

 

Who Sabotages Your Diet Plans

 

How-to-Eat-Healthy-When-Your-Spouse-Doesnt-Want-To

 

 

Money conflicts are common among couples—they may even be the leading cause of fights. But did you know many couples also have fights about food on a daily basis? In fact, the topic sparks so much interest, that a lot are talking about  how to keep peace at meals. Who is doing the sabotaging? Spouses, family, friends?

Men and women often have opposing Mars and Venus moments about nutrition, which can lead to tension and arguing in relationships. The sexes are wired differently: For example, men have a biological advantage over women due to their increased muscle mass. Losing and maintaining a healthy weight is easier for guys, and harder for women.

Want to really bring out the worst in people? Try weight loss. Ten pounds or a ton, you’ll be showered with so much fattening food—sabotage by people who claim to love you—that it will send the price of sugar cane and lard futures through the roof.

I’ve seen it happen so many times to many weight loss patients that they start making excuses.  They confess they fell off the wagon, I’m ready with my ritual response: “Who did this to you?”

Who Sabotages Your Diet Plans? Spouses/Family/Friends

They’re always shocked to think that someone else may have had a hand in their weight loss failure. Then it dawns on them: Oh yeah, the chocolate cake care package Mom just sent, the surprise candy from the usually unthoughtful husband, the coworker who left the gift-wrapped Oreos on your desk. “Why is that?” they always ask.”Diet saboteurs,” I explain. “They’re everywhere.” In fact, in one survey, 24,000 overweight women reported that weight loss created problems in their relationships that regaining the weight would have resolved.

are_your_friends_and_family_making_you_fat

The problem usually starts because you’re in change mode (and darned happy to be there), but your friends and family aren’t.

Rarely would a real friend malevolently undermine your diet. They just do unconscious things to keep the relationship the way it was.  And there are lots of reasons why.

They feel guilty. Your success pricks their conscience, since they may think they should be pursuing weight loss too. But for many, teasing you back to normal with “you’re doing so well; a little won’t hurt” sabotage is often easier. And if it starts an eating frenzy that ends in weight gain, sadly, that’s secretly okay with friends like these. You’ve proven once again that weight loss is impossible; now they can relax and not try.

They don’t understand. Other folks (often spouses!) who’ve never had a weight problem can’t understand why you don’t go back to eating normally now that you’ve lost that weight. And besides, they’ve suffered enough with all the changes around the house, and they want this to be over.

They miss the old you. Or more specifically, the food experiences you once shared. Food is often how we express love. Baking cookies for your kids (and of course eating some together). Or going to happy hour with coworkers. When my client Stephanie began progressing, her husband started showing up Friday nights with a big chocolate bar, something they used to enjoy together.

 

Three classic actions likely to pave the way to long-term weight loss success and fend off sabotage, whether deliberate or subconscious.

1. Start with exercise. It builds muscle, burns calories, reduces stress, and, best of all, creates the positive mood that makes you strong enough to avoid saboteurs.

2. Monitor your exercise and food. Plan your workouts and meals, and write down every bite. This will keep you honest, and it may also help you recognize the people and events that do you in. Then you can develop strategies to deal with them.

3. Create a supportive environment. It’s important to ask for help.  Asking is tricky because we really don’t know how to do it. We tend to believe that if people loved us, they’d know what to do. Not true! Some like it if their husband’s takes their plate away from them when he thinks they had enough.  On the other hand, some would secretly eat twice as much if her husband did that.  Get a support group, people to be accountable too, people who have the same goals. Try our challenge groups. People doing just what you are. @ https://www.facebook.com/fitatanyagewithdeb

 

Whether you write it or say it, be specific about your weight loss needs. Even those closest to you can’t read your mind. For instance, if being constantly asked how much you’ve lost will drive you to cheat, let people know. For others, constant checking in may help keep them on track. If you need support when the late-night munchies hit, ask your friend if it’s okay to call.

When it comes to long-term relationships and marriage, men win out there too. Studies have shown that women tend to gain weight when they marry. (Men may gain weight, too, but overall they actually get healthier.) Many women complain that their spouses are sabotaging their healthy eating plans. In one study, more than 70% of women on diets complained that their spouses had interfered.

Here are some of the diet dilemmas women have asked me about, and my suggestions for how to handle them. If you’ve had a similar battle of the sexes over your meals and snacks, chime in below.

The salad vs. steak showdown
The problem: “My husband says salad, stir-fry, soy, and anything healthy is ‘rabbit food.’ He just wants a meat-and-potato-type meal.” Has to have fried food, bread etc..

The solution: Many men don’t find a plant-based diet as satisfying as a juicy, meaty, stick-to-the-ribs meal. What you can do is offer a compromise. Don’t try to get a carnivore hubby to be a vegan, but serve yourself smaller portions of meat and choose the leanest cuts. Pair them with a large salad or lots of steamed veggies. Try a few subtle substitutes: Serve baked and breaded zucchini fries instead of french fries, for example, and try dishes that use lean ground beef or turkey instead of the full-fat stuff.

Sneaky snack sabotage
The problem: “My husband brings home cookies, chips, sodas, and other junk food all the time.”

The solution: Your husband needs to know that the food he brings home isn’t helping your efforts to stick to a healthy diet, and it may be impacting the diets of your children too. While you can’t nag him about his habits, ask him to eat those foods when he’s at work or out for meals, rather than bringing them home.

Look for Part 2 coming soon.  Need help contact me and lets chat.

Your Partner in Health,

Debi

https://www.facebook.com/fitatanyagewithdeb

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