Health Back on Track

 

Health Back On Track

 

 

After the Big Thanksgiving Meals – Prep you following week

 

Thanksgiving is over. How many of us need to get back on track? I know I have to. Now comes the Holiday shopping that can be stressful. Between driving all over town, long lines in crowded stores, and the never-ending holiday music, it’s enough to make you want to throw up your hands and exclaim, “Bah humbug!”

Let us help. I put together a list of 40 Beachbody eating tips and gift ideas that will help make those in your life feel not only happy, but also healthy! Watch for articles everyday. Sign up to get alerts.

I divided the gifts by price-point so you can simply decide how much you wish to spend on someone and choose from several suggestions that are within that range. All items are available online, so take off that winter jacket, grab a glass of Shakeology®, and knock out your holiday shopping quickly and with the confidence that the gifts you’re giving will enrich the lives of those who receive them!

 

First, lets get you back on a clean eating with this week’s meal prep.

 

 

My Meals for the Week: 

 

 

Thanksgiving prep leftovers

 

Meal 1 (Breakfast): Overnight oats with 2 tsp. cocoa powder, ½ cup unsweetened almond milk, and mixed berries (2 yellow, 1 purple)
Meal 2 (Snack): 2 hard-boiled eggs with baby carrots and ½ banana (not shown) (1 red, 1 green, 1 purple)
Meal 3 (Lunch M/W/F): Sweet potatoes stuffed with black beans, corn, tomatoes, and broccoli, with chicken, and 2 tsp. olive oil (1 red, 1 yellow, 1 green, 2 tsp.)
Meal 3 (Lunch T/Th): Spiralized zucchini noodles with shrimp, quinoa, and 2 tsp. olive oil (1 red, 1 yellow, 1 green, 2 tsp.)
Meal 4 (Post-Workout): Shakeology blended with water and ice, and an apple (1 red, 1 purple)
Meal 5 (Dinner M/W/F): Chicken with a side of broccoli and ¼ avocado (1 red, 1 greens, 1 blue)
Meal 5 (Dinner T/Th): Tilapia with a side of steamed broccoli and cauliflower and ¼ avocado (1 red, 1 green, 1 blue)
Extra Snacks: Bell Peppers, Cucumber Salad

Grocery List: 
1 carton blueberries
1 carton blackberries
1 large carton strawberries
5 apples
3 bananas
unsweetened almond milk
1 dozen eggs
2 avocados
1 bag baby carrots
4 bell peppers
1 cucumber

3 large zucchinis
1 bag tri-color quinoa
3 medium sweet potatoes
1 can black beans
2 bags broccoli florets
1 bag broccoli and cauliflower mix
1 cup frozen corn
1 cup cherry tomatoes
3 green onions
Everything Spicy Flavorgod seasoning
1.5 lbs Turkey Breast
1 packet Tilapia
8 oz. baby shrimp
olive oil
cocoa powder
5 packets Shakeology

 

Breakfasts of chocolate overnight oats with fresh berries. Simply combine oats, almond milk, cocoa powder and berries in a mason jar and refrigerate. Make the recipe your own by adding a touch of cinnamon or nutmeg. Important meal of the day.

chocolate overnight oats with fresh berries

Prepare these tantalizing sweet potatoes stuffed with a medley of vegetables and black beans. Served with turkey breast, they are a filling, high-protein meal. Fans of spice could add seasonings like cumin, oregano, or chili powder to the mix to amp up the flavor even more.

 

Turkey

 

Other meals include zucchini noodles with shrimp and quinoa, super-clean Turkey and broccoli, and lots of healthy snacks. I am following the 21 Day Fix Eating Plan in the 1,500-1,799 calorie bracket, and container counts are included for each meal.

 

Thank you for taking the time to read and comment.

 

Your Partner in Health,

 

Debi

https://www.facebook.com/fitatanyagewithdeb/

Ways to Cook with Pumpkin

posted in: Beachbody, Recipes, Shakeology | 0

 

Ways to Cook with Pumpkin

 

pumpkin_wallpaper_447_amazing_wallpapers

 

Years ago, I thought the only thing you could do with pumpkins was carve funny faces into them, or somehow, magically turn them into pie. Now I know that there is so much more to them than that. I get excited when I see bright orange baking pumpkins appearing at farmer’s markets because I know I’ll soon be eating pumpkin bread, etc.

Pumpkin’s orange flesh is packed with fiber and is an excellent source of beta-carotene, which helps with vision and supports the immune system.

How to choose a pumpkin
Look for small, round pumpkins in the produce section marked “pie pumpkins” or “sugar pumpkins.” It’s OK if they have blemishes, but pass on any that have bruises or soft spots. Smaller pumpkins are the best kind for cooking. Avoid the larger type that you might choose for carving jack-o-lanterns, which have stringy, watery flesh and very little flavor. If you can’t find a proper pumpkin for cooking, you can substitute sweet potatoes or whole pumpkin from a can. Canned pumpkin puree makes it easy to add pumpkin flavor to your meals. Look for puree with no added spices or additives.

 

First recipe – I have tried this already it is a hit.

Pumpkin Pie Shakeology

Pumpkin shake

There is a full serving of yummy pumpkin in this pie-flavored smoothie. Pumpkin is an excellent source of vitamin A, which is important for healthy teeth and vision.

Total Time: 5 min.
Prep Time: 5 min.
Cooking Time: None
Yield: 1 serving

Ingredients:
¼ cup water
¾ cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk
1 scoop Vanilla Shakeology
½ cup canned pumpkin puree
1 tsp. pure maple syrup (or raw honey)
1 Tbsp. coarsely chopped raw pecans – I am not fond of nuts so I leave them out.
1 tsp. pumpkin pie spice
1 cup ice

Preparation:
1. Place water, almond milk, Shakeology, pumpkin puree, maple syrup, pecans, pumpkin pie spice, and ice in blender; cover. Blend until smooth.

 

Pumpkin shake 2

Let me know what you think?

More recipes to come.  Look for them on my Facebook page or here.

Your Partner in Health,

Debi

https://www.facebook.com/fitatanyagewithdeb/

Holiday Eating -Now What?

posted in: Beachbody, Health, Myths, Recipes, Shakeology | 0

Holiday Eating – Now What?

 

I will be writing some articles on how to keep your weight in control over the Holidays. Holiday eating is a killer.  Halloween through New Years can be a killer for your new found health. In a study, the researchers found that half of annual weight gain in the U.S. occurs during the holiday period. You have worked hard all year don’t let it go to waste in the last few months of the year.  Recipes, health tips, easy exercise will be included.

Santa thin

 

Avoiding holiday weight gain may sound as feasible as Santa fitting down billions of chimneys on Christmas Eve, but we promise there are logical strategies to stay on track. Many of us experience weight gain during the festive winter months, but packing on a few pounds in December is far from inevitable . Don’t get us wrong—the holiday season is all about celebrating, having fun, and indulging. So pass the eggnog and yule log (in moderation) and let’s tackle how to navigate holiday party food spreads, hectic schedules, and sidelined gym routines—without turning into Mr. Scrooge.

How to prevent holiday weight gain

Now that we’ve established how important it is to avoid weight gain during the holidays, let’s look at some strategies for keeping it off. Remember, there’s no one-size-fits-all approach to diet and nutrition. The recommendations I’m making here are not for normal weight, healthy individuals. They are for people that are already overweight and/or have a tendency to gain weight easily. In those cases, we might suspect that the homeostatic system that regulates weight is impaired in some way, and a specialized approach is required.

Some of these recommendations may surprise you if you believe that calories don’t matter and weight gain is not possible as long as you’re eating a nutrient-dense, low-carbohydrate diet. I used to think this was true myself, but after further research and more experience working with people, I now know that it is not. If you’re confused about this, please don’t get frustrated. We have all been there.

A food is rewarding when it makes us want to eat more of it. Palatable and reward usually travel together, but there are exceptions. For example, most people think steak tastes good, but it doesn’t tend to encourage eating beyond satiety.

Choosing foods that are lower on the reward value scale during the holidays is one way of spontaneously reducing your calorie intake. But what makes a food rewarding? There are several factors, including:

  • sugar, fat and salt content
  • calorie density
  • certain textures (fat that melts in mouth, crunchy, soft/easy to chew)
  • free glutamate
  • starch
  • certain aromas
  • variety of flavors, textures, foods
  • many other flavors can become rewarding when associated with above nutrients
Looking at that list, it’s not hard to see why holiday meals would promote overeating!
With that in mind, here are some tips for eating more simply during the holidays:
  1. Don’t add additional fat to your food. Skip the gravy and don’t put butter on your mashed potatoes (if you’re making them yourself, use less butter or cream in the first place). I personally add milk that is 1 or 2% and cream cheese that is 1/3 the calories.  It is still yummy but less calories over all.
  2. Reduce the variety of flavors, textures and foods you eat. Choose a main dish and one or two sides and stick with that.

Eat less

This one is easier said than done, right? The best way to accomplish this for most people is to focus on reducing the energy density of the food they consume. Energy density is defined as the number of calories in a given weight of food. A Paleo diet contains foods that are typically low on the energy density scale: animal protein, fruits, vegetables and tubers. A holiday feast contains foods that are typically high on the energy density scale: stuffing, bread, pie, cream, butter, gravy, etc.
Here are a few tips for reducing energy density:
  1. Add extra vegetables and starchy tubers (without added fat).
  2. Add extra protein to your meal.
  3. Chew your food thoroughly. This increases satiety.
  4. Cook a Paleo holiday meal and minimize energy dense foods typically associated with the holidays.

Move more

Exercise may not be a great strategy for weight loss, but it’s likely that physical inactivity helps prevent an increase in the body fat set point, and studies have consistently shown that exercise prevents weight gain and maintains leptin sensitivity in animals.
In the U.S., at least, holidays tend to be associated with a lot of TV watching, especially among sports fans. That means additional time sitting on your butt, which isn’t a particularly good way to burn calories.

So make sure to get plenty of exercise during the holidays. Take long walks after meals, add some extra workouts, stand whenever possible instead of sitting, and reduce your TV time.

 

I hope this will give you are start. Watch for more articles, tips recipes etc on this website or my Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/fitatanyagewithdeb/

 

Please feel free to add in the comments and other tips you have come across that help you.

Your Partner in health,

 

Debi

 

Who Sabotages your Diet Plans – Part 2

posted in: Beachbody, Health, Myths, Shakeology | 0

Who Sabotages your Diet Plans

sabotage-small

 

Please take time to read Part 1.  Important for your over all health.

There’s saboteur in every crowd— at the office, in your church group, among your closest friends and family. Sometimes they mean well, sometimes they seem a tad malicious, often they have no idea how they’re sabotaging you. But every time you take a step forward to gain dominion over food, they’re at your elbow– offering you a brownie, some chips, an extra heaping helping of pasta.

 

Experts sum it up in one word—Change. Getting fit through diet and exercise creates big changes in your life—changes you should welcome. But if your friends and family aren’t in the same mode of change, they can be oblivious, jealous, and uncomfortable with your changes. Perhaps:

  1. They feel guilty. You’re losing weight and getting in shape. They’re not. Tempting you to “fall off the fitness wagon” means you’re “normal” again, and they can feel good about the status quo.
  2. They don’t understand. They’ve never had a weight problem and just don’t realize how hard you’ve worked to get where you are. They think it’s “silly” for you to worry about what you eat.
  3. They miss the old you. That is, the cookies you brought to work, the after-work “happy hours” spent in the company of high-fat potato skins, the luscious desserts you used to indulge in. Maybe you’re spending more time in the gym and have less free time for them. Maybe they’re afraid to lose you.

Don’t overreact, but don’t give up either! Try these strategies to vanquish your perennial food foes:

 

Don’t assume the worst. Unless sabotage is blatantly deliberate, give saboteurs the benefit of the doubt when it comes to their motives. If your mother serves you lasagna—your favorite– perhaps it’s because she equates food with love, not that she wants you fat. At any rate, it doesn’t pay to get defensive.

Just say no. You wouldn’t expect to have a drink forced on you if you were a recovering alcoholic, and you shouldn’t have to submit to having fattening food foisted on you. Tell the food pusher, “No, thanks,” and leave it at that. You don’t owe an explanation. Nor do you need to feel guilty if you choose to avoid someone who’s not helpful to your cause.

Take it and leave it. Granted, the thought of wasted food is hard for many of us. You don’t have to be a member of the clean plate club. Remember, there are times when discretion is the better part of valor.

Look for patterns. Be on the lookout for situations that trigger your diet downfalls, perhaps with a food journal. It may help you recognize people and events that do you in, allowing you to develop strategies to deal with them. If you know, for example, that there are likely to be donuts by the office coffeemaker, it’ll be much easier to resist them if you have your own healthy but satisfying snack.

Set up your own support system. If you can recruit friends and family to your cause, you may be able to create a valuable support system. Numerous studies show that when your social network supports you, you reap positive results. If that’s not feasible, take a different approach: join a weight-loss group, (Team Beachbody)  or avoid friends (at least temporarily) who are a negative influence, maybe even make new friends who share your goals. You’ll get stronger with time, and be able to handle the not-so-supportive folks.

Ask for help. Keep in mind that your weight-loss needs are unique. Don’t expect loved ones to exercise telepathy to know what your needs are. Tell them! Be fair and reasonable, especially with those who share your home. They may be willing to make compromises, at least for shorter periods of time, about what foods are kept and cooked in the house.

Be a grownup. Remember that what you put in your mouth is your responsibility. While others may tempt you, ultimately you’re in charge of your own life. Look at difficult situations as opportunities to flex your newfound control muscles– and reinforce the idea that you’re not adopting a healthier lifestyle for someone else, but for you.

 

We all can make excuses for not keeping to our goal.

Here are a list of some of mine.  Do they sound like yours?

  1. Oops,  I ate that candy bar.. now the day is a waste.

2.  I am so busy to worry about what I am eating

3.  Cost to much to buy healthy food – Remember if you are cutting out the junk you can afford the healthy *

4.  Here is a big one – The Holidays..

5.  I not feeling well today

6. To stressed out

7. Exercise – I hate exercise

 

I have friends tell me all the time that they can’t afford it or they are just to busy to stay on a plan or  I will start again when I have more time or it is not so close to the holidays. REALLY people you can say this?

WHAT is your health worth to you?

Please feel free to share your ideas or excuses in the comment box. Would love to hear from you.  Want to use some of your thoughts in my next article.

 

21 day to habit..

Watch for Part 3

 

Your Partner in Health,

 

Debi

Contact me @ https://www.facebook.com/fitatanyagewithdeb

 

 

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